Imagined as us-American:
Patriotic Music, Religion, and Violence Post-9/11


David Kwon

Kwon is an Assistant Professor of Moral Theology and Ethics at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota. Dr. Kwon received his Ph.D. in Theological Ethics from Boston College in 2018 where he worked with Rev. Kenneth Himes, Lisa Cahill, and Stephen Pope. He also holds an MBA and degrees in social work and social policy, and draws on his education and professional experience in these fields in his work as a social ethicist. Dr. Kwon's primary areas of teaching and research include the ethics of war and peace, immigration ethics, environmental ethics, health care ethics, and, more recently, business ethics, all of which he approaches from a global perspective. He is currently working up his dissertation, entitled Jus Post Bellum: Human Security and Political Reconciliation, for publication.


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Article Information:

Author: David Kwon

Title: "Imagined as us-American: Patriotic Music, Religion, and Violence Post-9/11"

Journal: Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry

Journal Issue: Volume 2, Number 1

Date: Spring 2020

Pages: 96-120

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2020.vol2.no1.05

Abstract

With the common correlation of the patriotic music community to “America,” country music after 9/11, in many respects, could be seen as a site for the reinforcement and construction of American national identity. This article particularly explores the use of country music in the United States to represent and create a political ideology of “imagined” national identity in the time period between September 11, 2001 and the invasion of Iraq in the Spring of 2003. However, the nation, as imagined in these country song lyrics, has very specific dimensions. It is not just any nation. It is perceived (and valued, for that matter) as justifiably aggressive. It is a Christian nation defined in opposition to the Islamic “other.” This targeted racial and religious group is not just an outside foreign “other” but a heavily stigmatized foreigner from within their own country. The mapping of these particular concepts of nation and religion onto mainstream country music constitutes its primary imagined identity.


 

Keywords: Patriotic Music, Country Music, Iraq War, Nationalism, Imagined National Identity, Religion, Violence, Post-9/11

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Citation Examples:

Turabian/Chicago:

(footnote) David Kwon, “Imagined as us-American: Patriotic Music, Religion, and Violence Post-9/11,” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 2, no. 1 (Spring 2020): 96‒120, https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2020.vol2.no1.05.

(bibliography) Kwon, David. “Imagined as us-American: Patriotic Music, Religion, and Violence Post-9/11.” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 2, no. 1 (Spring 2020): 96‒120. https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2020.vol2.no1.05.

MLA:

Kwon, David. “Imagined as us-American: Patriotic Music, Religion, and Violence Post-9/11.” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry, vol. 2, no. 1, Spring 2020, doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2020.vol2.no1.05, pp. 96‒120.

APA:

Kwon, D. (2020). Imagined as us-American: Patriotic Music, Religion, and Violence Post-9/11. Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry, 2(1), 96‒120. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2020.vol2.no1.05.

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 2.0 License. Information on obtaining permissions beyond the scope of this license is available at SHERM Journal Permissions.

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