Theology as a Science:
An Historical and Linguistic Approach


Mark Moore

Moore is an assistant professor of theology at William Jessup University. He holds a PhD in theology and apologetics and focuses his research on theological methodology, creedal theology, and theology in relation to popular culture. He is the cohost of the podcast, Jessup Think, as well as an author and speaker.


 

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Article Information:

Author: Mark Moore

Title: "Theology as a Science: An Historical and Linguistic Approach"

Journal: Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry

Journal Issue: Volume 1, Number 2

Date: Fall 2019

Pages: 241-250

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.07

Abstract

This article argues that, given the historical and linguistic background of the terms involved, the study of theology can, in fact, be considered a scientific endeavor, but one must clearly note what is inferred by the term “scientific.” Historically, the term “science” or “scientific” has dealt with the realm of knowledge of both the natural and supranatural world. The question of whether theology should be classified as a science arose during the formation of the medieval universities in the thirteenth century, as well as the formation of modern German universities in the nineteenth century. Theologians from Aquinas to Schleiermacher argued that theology should be considered a science and, therefore, a proper subject of study in the university. The affirmation of theology as a science in this article is based on this historical survey, as well as the broader linguistic understanding of the term “science.”


 

Keywords: Theology, Metaphysics, Science, Wissenschaft, Knowledge, Wisdom

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Citation Examples:

Turabian/Chicago:

(footnote) Mark Moore, “Theology as a Science: An Historical and Linguistic Approach,” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 1, no. 2 (Fall 2019): 241-50, https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.07.

(bibliography) Moore, Mark. “Theology as a Science: An Historical and Linguistic Approach,” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 1, no. 2 (Fall 2019): 241-50. https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.07.

MLA:

Moore, Mark. “Theology as a Science: An Historical and Linguistic Approach.” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry, vol. 1, no. 2, Fall 2019, doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.07, pp. 241-50.

APA:

Moore, M. (2019). Theology as a Science: An Historical and Linguistic Approach. Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry, 1(2), 241-250. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.07.

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 2.0 License. Information on obtaining permissions beyond the scope of this license is available at SHERM Journal Permissions.

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