Theology, Metaphysics, and Science:
Twenty-First Century Hermeneutical Allies, Strangers, or Enemies?


Peter M. Antoci

Antoci is an adjunct professor at Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia, and rector of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. A graduate of George Washington University (B.A.), and The Catholic University of America (M.A.), Antoci holds a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from The Catholic University of America. Antoci has published articles in Key Resources, The Anglican Theological Review, The American Association of Higher Education Series on Service-Learning in the Disciplines, and Christianity and Literature. He is the author of Reflections on the Spirituality of Campus Ministry: A Play in Four Acts (Lexington, KY: Emeth Academic Press, 2012), which was winner of the Portaro Award for Creative Expression & Intellectual Inquiry, given at Yale University by The Office of Young Adult and Campus Ministries (TEC, 2012).


 

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Article Information:

Author: Peter M. Antoci

Title: "Theology, Metaphysics, and Science: Twenty-First Century Hermeneutical Allies, Strangers, or Enemies?"

Journal: Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry

Journal Issue: Volume 1, Number 2

Date: Fall 2019

Pages: 226-239

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.06

Abstract

This article answers the question of whether the study of theology and metaphysics can be classified currently, or ever qualify in the future, as a scientific endeavor. Rather than choose a particular theology or metaphysics as the subject of inquiry, this essay argues that it is not only necessary to recognize the role of hermeneutics within different fields of study, but that it is also necessary to begin a human hermeneutic with human experience. Changes in our global context, whether social, economic, political, or environmental, are important drivers of hermeneutical evolution. We should expect no less change in the areas of theology, metaphysics, and science. The question of truth, whether subjective or objective, is a hermeneutical one.


 

Keywords: Theology, Metaphysics, Science, Epistemology, Hermeneutics

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Citation Examples:

Turabian/Chicago:

(footnote) Peter M. Antoci, “Theology, Metaphysics, and Science: Twenty-First Century Hermeneutical Allies, Strangers, or Enemies?,” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 1, no. 2 (Fall 2019): 226-39, https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.06.

(bibliography) Antoci, Peter M. “Theology, Metaphysics, and Science: Twenty-First Century Hermeneutical Allies, Strangers, or Enemies?,” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 1, no. 2 (Fall 2019): 226-39. https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.06.

MLA:

Antoci, Peter M. “Theology, Metaphysics, and Science: Twenty-First Century Hermeneutical Allies, Strangers, or Enemies?” Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry, vol. 1, no. 2, Fall 2019, doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.06, pp. 226-39.

APA:

Antoci, P. M. (2019). Theology, Metaphysics, and Science: Twenty-First Century Hermeneutical Allies, Strangers, or Enemies? Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry, 1(2), 226-239. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.33929/sherm.2019.vol1.no2.06.

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 2.0 License. Information on obtaining permissions beyond the scope of this license is available at SHERM Journal Permissions.

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